Linneria 287-III (Part 3)

Now that my first book has been completed I’ve decided to try and write some fiction. This is my first attempt at it. I’m not sure how much I will write every day, but I plan on at writing something for this story every day this week. We shall see how it goes.  (Part 1 and Part 2)


*Target landing location identified. Northwestern edge of the largest continent. The weather is comfortable, it is primarily populated by non-reasoning animals, and there is plenty of plant life available to convert into food. The nation-states for the region are generally peaceful and egalitarian*

Wonderful. Thanks, SAM. Upload the top five languages for the planet and all local languages within the target area.

“Hopefully, I won’t need to speak to anyone…” she said out loud. In the relative silence of the spacecraft, her voice sounded strange, almost hollow. She stretched her mouth and tongue and realized that the muscles of her face were stiff and sore from disuse. She hadn’t talked in years.

*Beginning data transfer*

Tara’s body went slightly rigid as the languages flooded her brain. She felt light-headed and euphoric as new neurons were built and tested in her brain. After a few moments it was over and she understood how to converse in a dozen or so new languages. She practiced for a few minutes with each languange and tried to get her muscles accustomed to the movements. Her brain knew how to converse, but each movement felt foreign to her body. It would take some time before she could fluently speak, even with the nanobots doing all they could, but at least she would be able to understand what she saw or heard.

Ugh, I still hate that feeling. 

*I know, but we didn’t have any other option, would you like to see a photo of the intelligent life on this planet?*

She barely thought Sure when two images appeared on the screen in front of her. The images shimmered and slowly moved in a circle, showing Tara every angle. They also slowly changed color to display the variety of skin, hair, and eye tones for the species.

They’re kind of ugly, aren’t they?

*According to our understanding of aesthetics, yes they are. They long arms and legs, and oversized eyes make them appear unbalanced.*

That’s what it is, the eyes. They are so large and come in so many different colors. I wonder why they evolved that way?

*Would you like me to search their databases for their hypothesis on eye development?*

No, I’m just thinking out loud. I guess we better get on with it. SAM, land the craft.

Almost imperceptibly, Tara’s spacecraft began drifting towards the planet below. Tara’s view was dominated by the large, blue and green planet and she couldn’t stop thinking of how much it resembled her home. Sure, the blue was a little brighter and the planet had a deadly ring of deserts around the equator, but if she squinted she could almost pretend she was making an emergency landing home instead of crashing into a potentially deadly situation.

The ship rocked and vibrated as it entered the atmosphere. The hull and gravity shield was able to protect her from nearly anything, but the ride was still rough.

Then, it was over and laid out before her was the planet’s curving horizon. The snow capped mountains provided plenty of places for her to lay down her ship and stay hidden for a couple of years until a rescue ship arrived. It would be a boring few years but between SAM and the resources on the ship, she knew she could sleep most of the time.

The ship landed gently on the side of a non-descript mountain right along the treeline. SAM launched a handful of drones which began scanning the area for danger and camouflaging the ship.

Alright SAM, begin monitoring local media to see if anyone saw us come down. If we’re lucky, nobody recorded anything and we can just wait things out.

On a neighboring mountain, two creatures hunched behind a tree and stared across to Tara’s landing spot. They grunted to each other and waved their lanky arms dramatically. Their voices got louder and louder until, finally, the larger one sighed in defeat. They grabbed their weapons and headed towards the fallen craft.

Linneria 287-III (Part 2)

Now that my first book has been completed I’ve decided to try and write some fiction. This is my first attempt at it. I’m not sure how much I will write every day, but I plan on at writing something for this story every day this week. We shall see how it goes.  (Part 1 is available here)


SAM woke Tara gently with the sounds of the beach. She was dreaming of home and the crashing waves fit perfectly with what she was experiencing. SAM, of course, knew she was dreaming of home and provided stimulation that would help her transition into the waking world as seamlessly as possible.

Report SAM, how is everything looking?

*9.75 hours have passed. Data upload to the SLC is complete and erased from internal hard drives. I have a summary report about the Linneria 287-III and the dominant species whenever you are ready.*

Sounds good. Fill me in on the planet.

*Linneria 287-III is approximately 80% the size of our home world and is made up mostly of water. The poles are a moderate temperature but most of the planet is uncomfortably hot, though the dominant species appears to live nearly everywhere except the poles. I would assume their tolerance to temperature is very different than yours. Absent a violent death, they live approximately 70% of what your lifespan would be without Longevity Technology*

Longevity Technology, or LT for short. Tara was 145 years old, which means she remembered when people died from disease and old age. In fact, as an astronaut, she was one of the first people on her planet to get the nanobots implanted in her that kept her alive. Even as SAM communicated with her ship and processed all the information, the nanobots that made up SAM were constantly scanning her body for cancerous cells, harmful bacteria and viruses, and anything else that could age or kill her. When anything dangerous was detected the nanobots killed it and recycled the biological material for other uses. If she didn’t face a violent death she would live forever.

Immortality was likely for everyone back home. With the exception of a few religious zealots, everyone had embraced LT. It was implanted in everyone at birth and eliminated disease nearly overnight. It also had the added benefit of encouraging peace, when immortality became a possibility it became more difficult to get people to die or kill for a cause. He people quickly became good at finding peaceful solutions to complex problems when death was no longer inevitable.

SAM, how technologically advanced is the species and what do they call themselves?

*There are over one hundred separate languages spoken on the planet with no universal designation for the species. They have discovered nuclear fussion and are accelerating quickly towards LT, AI, and unlimited energy, but the progress is not guaranteed. There are several major nation-states who seem willing to annihilate the species in order to assert dominence. The majority of the people appear peaceful, but there is a fascination with violence and many view elected officials and the nation-state as religious figures*

Kara sighed audibly. That all sounded too familiar. Her own species was not much different 100 years ago. She was always a little surprised that they had pushed passed their primal tribalism and found a way to unite in peace. But they had, and hopefully the residents of Linneria 287-III would be able to as well.

*You are receiving a message from the United Space Science Authority, it states: Analysis of situation complete. Rescue underway, ETA 3.98 years. Initiate Directive 4*

Directive 4 – Land on the planet and observe. Stay hidden until help arrives.

SAM, locate an ideal place to land, the primary concerns are stealth, an ability to transmit to the SLC, and access to food and water.  Activate thrusters and bring us into orbit around Linneria 287-III, and try to keep us on the starside to minimize any chance that we will be noticed. 

Linneria 287-III (Part 1)

Now that my first book has been completed I’ve decided to try and write some fiction. This is my first attempt at it. I’m not sure how much I will write every day, but I plan on at writing something for this story every day this week. We shall see how it goes. 

—–

Tara woke to the sound of a loud siren and flashing red lights. Even with her post-hypersleep grogginess she knew something was wrong but she couldn’t concentrate with all the alarms blaring.

Silence alarms, she thought, and the alarms went silent.

*Good morning, Tara. Would you like a situation update?* A deep, familiar voice echoed through her mind. SAM was her internal computer system and it was linked directly to her spacecraft.

She didn’t actually “hear” SAM, but the nanobots that flowed through her blood stream stimulated the part of her brain that translated sound when it communicated with her. There was no sound but she felt like she heard something. She had the option of telling the computer to just upload everything into her mind, giving her instant knowledge, but that type of communication always creeped Tara out a little. Instant knowledge felt too much like relying on a hunch, instead she preferred the minor delay of having explicit communication with her computer.

Good morning. Yes, a situation update would be lovely.

*We have exited hyperspace on target but the ship has sustained some damage. Our drive is broken beyond repair and thrusters have limited power, though our solar panels are still functional and the nearest star is starting to recharge everything. Life support is functional.*

How far are we from Linneria 287-III? Tara asked. Linneria III was her destination, a small planet that circled the star Linneria 287. The newly developed United Space Science Authority had discovered signs of advanced life from Linneria 287-III several years earlier and dispatched Tara to observe, though it only felt like a couple of weeks had passed since she received the orders to venture out into this new solar system.

*Approximately two days if we continue to drift on course, or we can enter their gravitational pull in approximately 12 hours if we use thrusters.*

Is there any chance of returning home?

*Negative. I have already relayed a distress signal to the SLC satellite circling the solar system, but best case scenario is it will be 3.75 years before someone will arrive.*

Huh. Well that’s unfortunate. Tara couldn’t help but shrug. She knew the risks when she took this mission, but the chance to be the first person to observe a new species was such an adventure and she couldn’t turn it down. How are our cloaking systems doing?

*Physical cloak is not operational, but we are still invisible to all forms of electronic scanning.*

Hmm, hopefully nobody on the ground is pointing their telescopes directly at us.

*It is unlikely that the primitive species on the ground has the capabilities to see a craft this size. We should be safe as long as we stay in high orbit.*

Okay, life support is good but how about food and water?

*The solar-to-water convertor is functional and there are enough rations for 1.5 years.*

Shit. Okay, that’ll be a problem for later. Continue broadcasting all the information you have to the SLC and begin uploading all the information you can get from the planet. Begin uploading any digital databases available from their satellite networks. We might as well do our jobs and find out all we can about the civilization on this planet.

*Confirmed. It will take approximately 9 hours to upload all the information on the planet.*

Sounds good. I’m going to get a little sleep, wake me when all the data is downloaded or if something else happens. Good night SAM.

Week 1: The Two Biggest Secrets to Success

This is part of my weekly project at self-improvement by following the battle plan found in “Forward Tilt: An Almanac for Personal Growth.” This book is incredibly valuable and only $0.99 on Kindle.

This week’s lesson (practice? guideline? challenge?) focuses on the two most important factors in creating possibility in your life: creating value and signaling the value you created. This lesson comes at an important time for me. I just completed my first book and have been struggling with advertising it. I feel like I’m bragging if I talk about it more than just the original post, but maybe I shouldn’t. Maybe I should put more effort into advertising what I created and am proud of.

So, in answer to this week’s challenge, I am going to work on cultivating a professional outlet for my creations. I will also be writing daily fiction and putting it on my blog (my first creative love is fiction writing). Like Steven Pressfield discusses in “The War of Art”, in order to overcome Resistance we need to be a professional. I am a professional writer and I should act like it.

My rough plan looks like this:

Monday – Research advertising options Facebook and such
Tuesday – Create a professional page on Facebook, set up a Twitter account, update LinkdIn
Wednesday – Website Complete
Thursday – Set up Podcast
Friday – Wrap up loose ends or work on other stuff that came to mind this week

Forward Tilt: An Almanac for Personal Growth

Isaac Morehouse and Hannah Franklin have completed a new book that I desperately needed, something I didn’t realize that until I purchased it. “Forward Tilt: An Almanac for Personal Growth” is a battle plan for every artist, entrepreneur, life student, or individual who needs a kick in the butt occasionally to create and grow.

The book is broken down into 52 posts and each post has a brief explanation and an action item. The action item is my favorite part, it provides an actual outline for how to get more out of each day or week. I’m notoriously terrible at sticking to long-term plans (as all humans are) and having weekly benchmarks is perfect for me. You can just read one a week but the sections are so short that I’m going to read it straight through this week.

As part of my dive into this book, I will be posting weekly updates about each chapter and my own action plan. I have a Google Calendar alert set up for 1400hrs every Sunday for “Tilt”. When that alarm goes off I am going to look back on my accomplishments over the previous week, print out the new week’s section and pin it next to my, and then blog about it all.

For anyone who follows Isaac’s blog (and everyone should) you will recognize some of the advice in this book. His casual and inspiring tone comes through clearly and this book is easily worth the $0.99 for the Kindle edition (yes, that’s ninety-nine cents). Hell, the fact the book inspired this blog posts means I’ve already gotten my money’s worth.

This book is a mixture of Steven Pressfield, Tim Ferriss, and Ryan Holiday, and provides a blueprint and inspiration for success. So, go out and grab this book. Even if you don’t follow the plan to the letter, there are bound to be some pearls of wisdom in this short book that will make the path towards your goals a little bit clearer.

Everything Has Value For Artists and Entrepreneurs

I consume a lot of information from a variety of sources, that is one of the perks of living in this amazing age. At my fingertips I have more music, books, podcasts, and magazines than I could consume in ten lifetimes, and more is being created every day. It is overwhelming and awesome and terrifying. At times, I am painfully aware of my own mortality when I finish a book and am trying to decide what to read next.

Do I pick up Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman or The Sandman Volume 5 by Neil Gaiman? Should I dive deeper into my interest in yoga or should I read about the history of anarchist theory? How about trying to improve my life by reading a self-help book, or maybe my time would be better spent finally finishing Crime and Punishment. Or maybe, I should take a break from reading and watch Star Trek: EnterpriseThe X-Files, or Jersey Shore, or play World of Warcraft. I could also sign up for MMA classes, listen to The Beatles with the lyrics pulled up on my computer, listen to a D&D podcast, join the local board game club, or start learning German (again).

As awe-inspiring as my options are I find comfort in knowing that there is no wrong decision. However, I choose to spend my leisure time I know there will be value in it because value is created by me. Value isn’t something tangible that you can pick up, hold, or store away in a sock drawer where it will sit waiting and unchanging. There is no objective measure of value where A Tale of Two Cities has 374 value points and is, therefore, a better use of my time than watching Top Chef: Seattle which only has 196 value points.

No, there is value in all things. If I watch or read or experience something and can’t find value in it, that is my weakness as a student and not necessarily a reflection on the creator. As an artist, I should be on the lookout for inspiration everywhere. Each “trashy” tv show is a collection of characters for a dystopian novel. Every game of Settlers of Catan is an opportunity to hone my strategic thinking and to understand how other people behave when under stress. Every experience I have, from reading Anal Pleasure and Health: A Guide for Men, Women, and Couples to listening to The Dungeon Master’s Block podcast provides nearly infinite inspiration and value for my life, if I just know how to see it.

I create my own value. I find my own inspiration. I just need to keep my eyes open and consume, consume, consume. And the more diverse the sources, the more tools I’ll have at my disposal when I sit down to create.

Setting Myself Up For Success

Working from home provides unique challenges to overcome. Sure, I love the freedom and flexibility of setting my own hours and accepting the jobs I want to accept, but I don’t have a boss peering into my office to make sure I’m being productive. The only pressure I feel is the internal need to do what I promised to do and make sure I have enough cash to not starve. It takes discipline, focus, and a sense of entrepreneurship that school didn’t train me for, particularly when it comes to my professional projects that I don’t get paid for. When I’m writing or creating art or exercising there is even less pressure because the only person I will let down is myself, and I tend to be very forgiving, I can always relate to my own excuses.

But, the most important thing I’ve found to keep me on task and doing my work is to establish a system for success. For me, that system starts before the day does. The most important 30 minutes of every day actually starts the night before when I meditate on the day and prepare for the next.

Every night (well, every night that I’m not a huge slacker), I have a staff meeting with myself to figure out what my goals are for the next day. This includes everything from paid work to exercise plan to writing. I type up my expectations for the next day and then I print it out and set it prominently on my desk.

For example, the list sitting next to me says:

Saturday 2/18
– Khan Academy, Stoic Study, Meditation
– Exercise – 5-Mile Run
– Exercise – Yoga Video #7
– Website – Complete Book Recommendations Page and go ive
– Website – Write one blog post
– Book – Research new computer for Audible recording
– Reading – 1 hour
– Errand – Home Depot for shovel and planting soil
– Work – Civitas – Complete XX project and continue XX project ~4 hours

Once I have a list of tasks for the next day I get my house and office ready. I know that when I wake up my motivation will be at an all time low and I need things as organized as possible to encourage success. First, I set out my workout and work clothes for the next day. Each morning I put on my workout clothes and don’t take them off until I’m done exercising. As much as I loathe pants, I don’t work in pajamas. Then I get the coffee prepped, set the necessary workbooks and such next to my computer, and clean up my desktop.

After that, I clean the house. This involves cleaning the kitchen and bedroom first, and sometimes the bathroom. I don’t clean things deeply but I do pick up the clutter and sweep daily. I’ve found that having a dirty home kills my productivity. Not only does it become a distraction to see things out of place, but it creates an excuse that pulls me away from what I should be doing. It is hard for me to motivate myself to work, particularly my writing, and any excuse I have to procrastinate I am tempted to take. It is amazing at how clean my house can become when there is other work I should be doing. I was the same in college, whenever I had a rough deadline it suddenly became necessary to clean my house, reorganize my bathroom, call my parents, etc. Basically, I remove as many excuses as possible and set things up in a way that allows me to transition into the day with minimal speedbumps.

Maybe this is a little anal of me, but it works for me. Setting up my day the night before has really upped my productivity and happiness. I have fewer wasted days where I look at the clock and wonder where the hell the day went. Maybe someday I won’t need this type of habit to create, but that day isn’t today.

Regretting Being a Parent is Okay

I’ve used the words “mother” and “parent” in this blog mostly interchangeably. In our society, the vast, vast majority of the pressure for parenthood is placed on the mother. In fact, I’d be willing to bet that many people would view a woman who voiced regret about having a child less favorably than a man who actually acts on that regret by abandoning the child.

Parenting is probably the most important job in our society and it is a responsibility that should not be taken lightly. Not only should parents passionately want to have and raise children, they should also have the means and knowledge necessary to do that in today’s world.

Unfortunately, society doesn’t treat parenting that way. Instead of treating parenting with the respect it deserves we pressure people to enter into it unprepared and at too young of an age. Our society continues to pretend this difficult task that will alter the course of multiple lives will just “come naturally” and we shun women (and, to a lesser extent, men) who say that they don’t want children. People are often even forced to commit to having multiple children before experiencing raising one child (sometimes by partners and sometimes by society), or they are encouraged to have more children when they aren’t ready.

But, there is a group of people who receive even more vitriol and acidic hatred than those who choose not to have kids: those who have kids but admit to regretting it. Fortunately, some people are speaking out.

Parenting is more than just a job, it becomes an identity that is nearly impossible to escape. It becomes all-defining and casts a shadow over nearly anything else that a woman can accomplish. Attachment to any role is unhealthy because eventually that role will change and you will be left alone. Parents may technically be parents forever, but there will be a day when the children no longer need the parents and there will be psychological hell to pay if too much emphasis is placed on that identity.

Not only that, but a parent who regrets being a parent seems to break a social taboo and have betrayed society as a whole. It is the regret that dares not speak its name. The bond between mother and child is supposed to be so strong, so spiritual, so supernatural that it is seen as a moral failing of the highest degree to wish that bond never happened.

But that mindset is ridiculous and unhealthy and does nothing but worsen parenting for both the child and the parent. We should be allowed to vocalize our regret for something, it is only through that kind of honesty that we can prevent others from making a similar mistake (or, at the very least, give extra thought to the decision before making it).

We’ve lost the ability to discuss motherhood openly and rationally. We should be allowed to admit that we regret something, even parenting. It doesn’t even require having a shitty kid, some people enter into parenthood naive to what it will take or because they are pressured to do it. Parenting is something that a couple (traditionally) should both be 100% committed to, and if two people are on a different page when it comes to parenthood then that may mean terminating the relationship. Nobody should become a parent to please a partner. There are certain aspects of compatibility that don’t have a middle ground, parenting (like monogamy, lifestyle, etc.) is one of them. Parenting just isn’t for everyone.

 

To have a society of healthy parents without regret we need to stop making “motherhood” the primary role for women (and, to a much lesser extent “fatherhood” for men), there needs to be access to birth control and sex education, we should encourage people to think long and hard about having kids and not rush into it if they aren’t financially (and otherwise) prepared, and we shouldn’t pressure anyone into having one (or more) kids just because that is what you are “supposed to do”. But, most importantly, we can’t shun people who speak out against the norm. Becoming an outcast because of how you feel only forces people to hide who they truly are, which is a disservice to everyone involved.

 

“Buddhism: Plain & Simple” – A Review

Title: Buddhism: Plain & Simple
Author: Steve Hagen
Pages: 159 (including Appendix)
Rating: 5/5 Highly Recommended

It is hard to me to pinpoint exactly when I started to have an interest in Buddhism. I remember learning about it in a high school religion class, but that introduction was little more than “it isn’t really a religion but it kind of is”. I was a hardcore Christian at that time and I have no doubt that I saw Buddhism as simply another Satanic ruse to steal souls from Heaven.

In the decade and a half since high school, my interest in Buddhism has bubbled in my subconscious. I’ve purchased several books about it but rarely finish them. As much as I am interested in Buddhism the works I’ve read seemed unnecessarily vague and complex, I felt like the authors were playing tricks with words instead of just coming out and saying what Buddhism is.

Buddhism: Plain & Simple by Steve Hagen is the opposite of that.

Hagen does a fantastic job of stripping away the ceremony and tradition and supernatural side of Buddhism and gets to the core. He does a great job explaining what the foundation of Buddhism, to simply see the world as it is and to live in the moment. After finishing this book I couldn’t help but see incredible similarities between Buddhism and the Stoic philosophy that I know and love. I can’t help but wonder if followers of Buddha somehow interacted with the Ancient Greeks and helped influence Stoic thought. It seems plausible that in the 200ish years between the life of Buddha and Zeno’s teaching at the Stoa Poikile someone would have made it from India to Greece.

Buddhism and Stoicism are both tools that work to find the truth about the world and encourage rational action in response to the truth. They are about helping individuals live better, happier, more satisfying and authentic lives. This is unlike the faith that I grew up in that demanded obedience to rules and discouraged intellectual inquiry. Buddhism explicitly rejects any hard rules and recognizes that the world is fluid and nuanced and diverse circumstances can easily turn rules into tools of injustice.

Mostly, I enjoy that Buddhism does not need to conflict with scientific discovery. As the Dalai Lama said in the foreword to Destructive Emotions:

I have often said that if science proves facts that conflict with Buddhist understading, Buddhism must change accordingly. We should always adopt a view that accords with the facts. If upon investigation we find that there is reason and proof for a point, then we should accept it.

Here was a system of spirituality that didn’t conflict with the natural world, and I believe that is why Buddhism will end up outlasting many of the religions of today. I am still far from an expert on Buddhism, but Buddhism: Plain & Simple laid the groundwork for me to continue my pursuit of knowledge in that direction. It is an easy, quick read that is made up of relatively short and succinct chapters. I highly recommend it for anyone who is interested in understanding this life philosophy.

The Words I Use

A recent(ish) Big Think article crossed my Facebook feed recently and it got me thinking about language. In particular, the language that I use and how it might impact how I see the world. By reflecting on the words I use I hope to live a better life, a life that is more at peace with reality, a life in which I can reach my full potential (or at least one in which I am honest with myself about what that would cost).

Let’s take a look at the language used to describe people who think differently than I do about political issues. Once upon a time, a lifetime ago, I lived in Washington DC and worked in policy and politics. While living in DC I proudly proclaimed that I lived among “the enemy”. I was surrounded by “evil statists” and “theocrats”. The enemy was everywhere and, while I may have felt like I was fighting a good fight, I was miserable. Not only was I stressed out all the time, I really wasn’t making any positive change in the world.

How could I? When other people are my “enemy” I can’t learn from them or teach them, all I can do is seek to destroy them. You don’t treat your enemy with love and understanding, you don’t seek compromise. No, you destroy them. You dehumanize them. You reduce them to their political philosophy or religion or social views or any other convenient label that pushes them into “the other” so that you can fight them guilt-free. Eventually, even your allies become enemies because they lack the purity of your own point of view. By classifying other humans as my enemy I only succeeded in defeating myself.

Similarly, using negative language (mental and spoken) to describe my own limitations only prevents me from growing and trying. It is easy to blame genetics for my failure (“I’m not creative”, “I’m terrible at learning new languages”, “I lack the musical talent necessary to play an instrument or dance”, “I’ll never have a six-pack”, etc. etc. ad nauseam). This is all a cop-out. Being honest with myself is difficult because when I’m honest I know that I haven’t really tried. Trying may actually lead to disappointment, it is much easier to convince myself that the fates or gods or Darwin made me incapable of accomplishing a difficult task. Why put forth the effort if the result is predetermined?

But that negative view of my own abilities isn’t reality. The truth looks more like this: “Learning to play a musical instrument seems incredibly difficult and it isn’t a priority for me right now, but I could probably do it if I dedicated time and effort to it”. So, by changing my internal speech I become more honest, but an excuse disappears from my Slacker’s Toolbox. I’m forced to admit that something I claim is important (art, reading, music, fitness, etc.) isn’t actually something I value enough to work on.

Lastly, and maybe most importantly, words have power in our society. While many people claim that using certain words isn’t hurtful and asking people to change how they speak is being “politically correct”,  that isn’t true. People can be hurt by words and using words derogatorily dehumanizes people. Whether it is using words like fag or retard in a negative way, or intentionally misgendering someone, words can be a weapon used to put people down and claim superiority over them. Sometimes this happens intentionally by people in power. For example, the use of masculine words as the default when the gender isn’t known. When the modern English language was evolving there was a real effort to ensure the masculine reigned supreme. According to 16th Century Grammarian William Lily “The masculine gender is more worthy than the feminine”.

Language has power, both in our personal lives and in society as a whole. It can be used to put people down and control them, or it can be used to lift people up and liberate them. It is a choice we each must make, we can just go with tradition or default to “that’s the way my parents/culture/whatever talk” or we can choose to be more sensitive and eliminate language from use that only serves to harm and separate us from our fellow humans and the potential we each have.