Linneria 287-III (Part 1)

Now that my first book has been completed I’ve decided to try and write some fiction. This is my first attempt at it. I’m not sure how much I will write every day, but I plan on at writing something for this story every day this week. We shall see how it goes. 


Tara woke to the sound of a loud siren and flashing red lights. Even with her post-hypersleep grogginess she knew something was wrong but she couldn’t concentrate with all the alarms blaring.

Silence alarms, she thought, and the alarms went silent.

*Good morning, Tara. Would you like a situation update?* A deep, familiar voice echoed through her mind. SAM was her internal computer system and it was linked directly to her spacecraft.

She didn’t actually “hear” SAM, but the nanobots that flowed through her blood stream stimulated the part of her brain that translated sound when it communicated with her. There was no sound but she felt like she heard something. She had the option of telling the computer to just upload everything into her mind, giving her instant knowledge, but that type of communication always creeped Tara out a little. Instant knowledge felt too much like relying on a hunch, instead she preferred the minor delay of having explicit communication with her computer.

Good morning. Yes, a situation update would be lovely.

*We have exited hyperspace on target but the ship has sustained some damage. Our drive is broken beyond repair and thrusters have limited power, though our solar panels are still functional and the nearest star is starting to recharge everything. Life support is functional.*

How far are we from Linneria 287-III? Tara asked. Linneria III was her destination, a small planet that circled the star Linneria 287. The newly developed United Space Science Authority had discovered signs of advanced life from Linneria 287-III several years earlier and dispatched Tara to observe, though it only felt like a couple of weeks had passed since she received the orders to venture out into this new solar system.

*Approximately two days if we continue to drift on course, or we can enter their gravitational pull in approximately 12 hours if we use thrusters.*

Is there any chance of returning home?

*Negative. I have already relayed a distress signal to the SLC satellite circling the solar system, but best case scenario is it will be 3.75 years before someone will arrive.*

Huh. Well that’s unfortunate. Tara couldn’t help but shrug. She knew the risks when she took this mission, but the chance to be the first person to observe a new species was such an adventure and she couldn’t turn it down. How are our cloaking systems doing?

*Physical cloak is not operational, but we are still invisible to all forms of electronic scanning.*

Hmm, hopefully nobody on the ground is pointing their telescopes directly at us.

*It is unlikely that the primitive species on the ground has the capabilities to see a craft this size. We should be safe as long as we stay in high orbit.*

Okay, life support is good but how about food and water?

*The solar-to-water convertor is functional and there are enough rations for 1.5 years.*

Shit. Okay, that’ll be a problem for later. Continue broadcasting all the information you have to the SLC and begin uploading all the information you can get from the planet. Begin uploading any digital databases available from their satellite networks. We might as well do our jobs and find out all we can about the civilization on this planet.

*Confirmed. It will take approximately 9 hours to upload all the information on the planet.*

Sounds good. I’m going to get a little sleep, wake me when all the data is downloaded or if something else happens. Good night SAM.

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